Microdosing edibles for OCD

Feb 14, 2024The nama Team
Microdosing edibles for OCD

Do obsessions and compulsions have you stuck in an endless loop of anxiety and fear? About 2.3% of adults and about 1 in 100 children in the United States are affected by obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). 

For those who struggle with repetitive intrusive thoughts and actions, the burden of OCD can feel inescapable. Our delicious THC edibles could offer a way out. 

A 2020 study published in Frontiers in Psychiatry found that microdoses of THC may significantly improve OCD symptoms and overall quality of life. 

Rather than providing a mind-altering high, our precise cannabis microdoses can gently ease OCD symptoms. Read on to discover the plethora of therapeutic benefits of microdosing cannabis, and how they may help quiet obsessive thoughts, reduce compulsive behaviors, curb anxiety, improve sleep, enhance focus, and restore quality of life for OCD sufferers.

Euphoria Triple Berry [10ct]
Euphoria Triple Berry [10ct]
THC
THC Sampler
THC Sampler
THC
Buzz Drops™ [THC Drink Drops]
Buzz Drops™ [THC Drink Drops]
On Sale from $29.00
Buzz Drops™ [THC Drink Drops]

THC: 2.5 mg | CBD: 2.5 mg (per serving)

Save up to $27.00 THC
Energy Gummies
Energy Gummies
From $27.00
Energy Gummies

THC: 2.5 mg | CBD: 5 mg

THC
Bliss Gummies
Bliss Gummies
From $27.00
Bliss Gummies

THC: 5 mg | CBD: 5 mg

THC
relax plus thc gummies on white background
relax plus gummies with description and ingredients
From $27.00
Relax Plus Gummies

THC: 5 mg | CBD: 25 mg

THC
sleep plus gummies on white background
sleep plus thc gummies with descriptions and ingredients
From $27.00
Sleep Plus

THC: 2 mg | CBD: 25 mg | Melatonin: 3 mg

THC

What is OCD?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder or OCD is a chronic mental health condition characterized by intense, uncontrollable thoughts (obsessions) that lead to repetitive behaviors (compulsions). People with OCD feel unable to control these intrusive thoughts and ritualized actions, as they often disrupt their daily functioning. 

OCD often evolves slowly over the years, worsening with stress or other triggers. While they may fade at times, the symptoms of OCD tend to persist long-term if not treated properly.

What are the symptoms of OCD?

Obsessive-compulsive disorder involves a set of distinct yet related symptoms. These can include:

  • Obsessions: persistent unwanted or intrusive thoughts that generate anxiety. Common obsessions revolve around fears of contamination, losing control, making mistakes, or taboo or forbidden ideas related to sex or religion.
  • Compulsions: repetitive ritualized behaviors or mental acts performed to temporarily ease anxiety triggered by obsessions. These involve excessive hand washing, checking, counting, and arranging items in precise order.
  • Significant distress and life interference: OCD symptoms can consume over an hour each day. 
  • Insight into irrationality: many people with OCD recognize the senselessness of their obsessions and compulsions, yet feel powerless to resist them.
  • Co-occurring conditions: OCD can coincide with related issues such as tic disorders, anxiety, depression, or substance abuse in efforts to cope.

Types of OCD

Obsessive-compulsive disorder consists of different themes or dimensions of obsessions and compulsions. Here are some common types of OCD:

  1. Contamination OCD: obsessional fears of germs or pollution leading to compulsive cleaning and washing rituals.
  2. Harm OCD: intrusive visions of causing harm or catastrophic events that drive checking or mental rituals.
  3. Perfectionism OCD: obsessive worries about order, symmetry, and exactness fuelling arranging and repeating rituals.
  4. Sexual OCD: intrusive taboo thoughts or images of a sexual nature prompting mental rituals.
  5. Religious OCD: blasphemous obsessional preoccupations prompting compulsive praying or confessing.
  6. Relationship OCD: obsessive doubts about one’s relationship status or partner's fidelity, driving compulsive reassurance-seeking behaviors.

What causes OCD?

The underlying origins of obsessive-compulsive disorder are still unclear. Certain risk factors likely work together to contribute to the development of OCD. Medical experts at the Mayo Clinic suggest that a mixture of genetic vulnerability, biological abnormalities, and environmental influences can trigger the onset of OCD. 

Here are the factors that may contribute to OCD:

  1. Close relatives with OCD.
  2. Alterations in brain structure or functioning related to emotional control, decision-making, and inhibitory control.
  3. Childhood temperament and innate anxious or rigid personality traits.
  4. Stressful or abusive childhood experiences.

How is OCD treated?

While obsessive-compulsive disorder is a chronic condition with no known cure, some treatments can help manage OCD symptoms. The main therapies fall into three categories.

  • Psychotherapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and exposure and response prevention (ERP) teach patients to tolerate obsessive thoughts without reacting compulsively.
  • Medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) help regulate serotonin, a key chemical messenger in the brain implicated in OCD. 
  • Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) stimulates targeted brain regions connected to OCD using magnetic pulses. 
  • Deep brain stimulation involves surgically implanted electrodes that deliver electrical stimulation to OCD-linked brain areas. 

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, the most effective approach typically combines CBT like ERP with an SSRI regimen. 

Despite the efficacy of prescriptions and therapy programs, some people are exploring more natural options—one of which is microdosing cannabis edibles. Small amounts of THC and CBD may gently modulate the brain’s chemicals (including serotonin) and ease anxiety circuits tied to obsessive thinking and compulsive behaviors. Small THC doses seem to provide OCD relief without the cognitive impairment and grogginess that come with higher doses. 

Can microdosing cannabis help with OCD?

An emerging body of research suggests that cannabis microdoses might help alleviate obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms without causing impairment. 

Our cannabis edibles contain between 2 and 10 mg of THC, which makes them the safest and most reliable methods of consuming cannabis. (Definitely healthier than smoking and vaping.) Unlike higher recreational doses, small amounts of Delta 9 THC interact with brain systems differently to gently ease anxiety and repetitive urges. 

Early evidence and anecdotal reports indicate that cannabis microdosing may:

  • Quiet obsessive thoughts and intrusive thinking patterns
  • Lessen compulsive behaviors and mental ritualizing
  • Reduce anxiety and distress around specific OCD triggers
  • Lift depression that often accompanies chronic OCD
  • Boost the ability to tolerate uncertainty and resist reacting compulsively
  • Enhance sleep quality for those kept awake by repetitive thoughts
  • Improve daily functionality, concentration, and quality of life

A 2021 study analyzed data from 87 individuals with OCD who tracked the severity of their symptoms before. After 1,810 cannabis use sessions, patients often reported a reduction in the severity of their compulsions or anxiety immediately after use.

Mexican researchers reported that even a non-psychoactive derivative of cannabis such as cannabidiol (CBD) has been used to treat substance use disorders. Combinations of THC with higher levels of CBD were able to temporarily reduce symptoms of OCD such as anxiety, compulsions, and intrusive thoughts. 

Mauzay, et. al. found that “patients [in their study] reported a 60% reduction in compulsions, a 49% reduction in intrusions, and a 52% reduction in anxiety from before to after inhaling cannabis. Higher concentrations of CBD and higher doses predicted larger reductions in compulsions.” 

Why are THC and CBD so beneficial when combined? Read on to find out.

Therapeutic potential of the THC and CBD in the entourage effect

THC and CBD have complementary effects, so they work better together by enhancing each other's benefits. This is the so-called entourage effect theory. It suggests that taking cannabis compounds together produces the “entourage” of therapeutic effects from the cannabis plant’s full spectrum components.

THC and CBD both interact with the brain’s endocannabinoid system (ECS). Unlike THC, CBD is non-intoxicating and does not produce the "high" typically associated with cannabis. When consumed together, CBD can modulate the effects of THC, which can help mitigate its potential psychoactive effects, such as anxiety or cognitive impairment. The best part is, you still experience the full extent of its therapeutic benefits, such as pain and anxiety relief or relaxation. 

That’s why many of our edibles contain balanced ratios of THC and CBD. Our full-spectrum CBD gummies are the best if you want to consume low, precise amounts of cannabidiol and Delta 9 to gently modulate your endocannabinoid system and target the root causes of OCD.

Our full spectrum Energy gummies contain only 2.5 mg of THC, balanced perfectly by 5 mg of CBD. If you’re looking for a boost in energy and focus and get rid of anxious thoughts, the combination of these powerful cannabinoids in low doses might be exactly what you need. 

"On days where I have blocks of time set aside for deep, focused work, these with a mug of hot tea are perfect. I feel like my research goes better, I enjoy the process more, and I come away from those sessions feeling refreshed instead of drained. So much better than an afternoon coffee."

Mike M

How is the endocannabinoid system involved with OCD?

The endocannabinoid system is an intricate network of neurotransmitters and receptors throughout the body that regulates many functions such as mood, pain perception, appetite, and cognition. Key receptors called CB1 and CB2 mediate ECS signaling. Cannabinoids from the cannabis plant (phytocannabinoids) can mimic internal endocannabinoids and influence the ECS by binding these receptors. 

Disturbances in ECS functioning may contribute to compulsive behaviors and intrusive thinking. CBD can desensitize excess CB1 activity that spurs repetitive urges, while small THC doses can stimulate CB1 to reduce anxiety and enhance cognitive flexibility around obsessive fears. Together, microdosing THC with CBD may act on the ECS to restore balance and inhibit the excessive ECS activity that is hypothesized to drive OCD. 

An activated ECS may also curb inflammation implicated in some OCD cases. That’s why microdosing cannabis is so great at reducing inflammation—THC and CBD boost the endocannabinoid tone and dampen receptor signaling to counteract the ECS problems potentially underlying some cases of OCD.

If you’re new to microdosing cannabis, you should probably start small. Our Sleep Plus gummies are perfect for giving your ECS a gentle nudge with only 2 mg of THC, 25 mg of CBD, and 3 mg of melatonin. These delicious gummies will have you sleeping like a baby instead of lying awake with those obsessive thoughts.

Product QUIZ

Need help deciding what product is best for you? Take our quiz, just three questions until your perfect match!

How much cannabis should you take for OCD?

Research on the use of cannabis for OCD is still evolving, and there is no established standard for the amount of cannabis to be used for managing OCD symptoms. Every brain's endocannabinoid system has slightly different sensitivities and responds differently depending on how much THC it interacts with. 

What we do know is that microdoses are always the way to go. Smaller amounts of cannabis provide more effective relief for OCD symptoms than higher doses. We’re talking precision THC doses of anywhere between 2 and 10 milligrams, enough to gently engage endocannabinoid receptors, yet subtle enough to avoid an intense high. 

Start low with mini doses, pay attention to the effects on your compulsions, and then incrementally adjust until you find your optimal daily dose for balancing symptoms. Small, consistent dosage tweaks beat guessing games for safe and sustainable OCD management. 

Remember, there are other ways to consume cannabis, but nothing beats the quality, efficacy, and safety of our low-dose THC edibles.

Do edibles have side effects?

All our edibles and THC beverages contain ultra-low doses of THC. There is virtually no danger of low THC amounts causing any adverse effects when consumed responsibly. 

If you do end up overconsuming and exceed the recommended single-serving dosage, here are some of the potential side effects you may experience:

  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Dry mouth
  • Lightheadedness
  • Anxiety and paranoia
  • Impaired motor functions
  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Drowsiness and fatigue, especially as effects taper off (known as “burnout”)

These negative outcomes can be avoided if you practice moderation and stick to low doses. If you’re a first-time user, stick to ultra-low doses to determine your tolerance level—we recommend trying the 2.2 mg of THC in our Buzz drops

Did you hear about our THC-infused mocktails? We have a collection of mouth-watering buzztails to quench your thirst and replace alcohol in all your favorite drinks—no side effects included. 

Buy the best edibles for OCD

Are you looking for the best THC edibles on the market to help quiet the relentless storm of intrusive thoughts? You’ve got to be smart about where you purchase your edibles. Skip the corner stores, shady brands, and sketchy products that provide no third-party lab tests and no guarantee that their products are safe and effective. 

You want the real deal: safe, third-party tested, quality Delta 9 edibles from reputable brands. Shop from nama and experience the best edibles to curb the symptoms of OCD. All of our edibles are organic, lab-tested for purity and potency, and expertly dosed from premium American hemp. 

Our Relax Plus gummies are a good place to start. With only 5 mg of Delta 9, these gummies hit the sweet spot for total mind and body relaxation.

Since our edibles contain cannabis compounds derived from hemp, all of our THC edibles are federally legal in the US. Read more about the legality of Delta 9 THC

Cannabis edibles for OCD FAQ

People with OCD should avoid foods that trigger or exacerbate anxiety symptoms, which can intensify obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors. These foods may vary depending on the individual but often include stimulants like caffeine, inflammatory foods that disrupt gut-brain connections, or unhealthy processed foods that destabilize blood sugar levels. A nutritious anti-inflammatory diet rich in Omega-3s, probiotics, antioxidants, and key micronutrients may ease anxiety circuits underlying OCD.

Effective treatments for OCD without drugs include various forms of psychotherapy like cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or exposure and response prevention (ERP) therapy. These talk therapies use techniques aimed at changing harmful thought patterns and gradually facing feared obsession triggers in a controlled way to help patients manage symptoms. Relaxation practices like mindfulness, meditation, yoga, or breathwork may also calm anxiety related to OCD. Aerobic exercise and healthy sleep habits support mental resilience.

The overwhelming power of OCD comes from biological roots: differences in brain structure and function related to emotional control, decision-making circuits, and inhibitory centers lead to deep feelings of anxiety combined with a diminished ability to resist obsessive thoughts or compulsive rituals. Disruptions in neurotransmitters like serotonin and the brain's endocannabinoid system also drive the intensity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Powerful evolutionary factors can further entrench OCD behaviors over time.

OCD tends to worsen during periods of high stress, uncertainty, or changes that disrupt normal life routines for people predisposed to obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors. Transition periods like starting school, changing jobs, financial strains, illnesses, new parenthood, or relationship issues commonly intensify the frequency and magnitude of OCD symptoms. Periods of emotional trauma or grief can also trigger the worsening of OCD.

While OCD symptoms do not directly cause schizophrenia or psychotic disorders, some research shows OCD may be a potential risk factor or marker for the development of schizophrenia-spectrum conditions in some cases. Shared genetics, biological pathways, and environmental factors seem to connect the two distinct disorders. With that being said, most people with OCD never develop schizophrenia.

To relax an anxious OCD-prone brain, employ techniques like diaphragmatic breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, mindfulness meditation, yoga, aerobic exercise, or spending time in nature. These activities reduce stress hormones like cortisol that exacerbate OCD while boosting relaxing neurotransmitters like GABA. Getting enough sleep and avoiding OCD behavior triggers also lets overactive brains reset. Consider cannabis compounds that alleviate anxiety, compulsions, and racing thoughts.

While OCD currently has no medical cure and tends to be a chronic long-term condition, some people experience full remission of OCD symptoms for months or years at a time. With proper treatment like cognitive-behavioral therapy, medication, lifestyle changes, or alternative modalities, many patients have experienced relief from OCD, especially those exhibiting mild to moderate symptoms initially. Recurrence remains a risk even for full remitters.

The lifetime course of OCD varies. Some experience worsening OCD symptoms and impairment into older age if left untreated. But others report improvement or remission later in life due to factors like changes in stress levels, brain development, or hormonal shifts. OCD severity in old age depends greatly on managing risk factors like isolation, medical issues, or cognitive decline that could re-trigger symptoms. Proper diagnosis and treatment help many older adults achieve stable, less disabling OCD.

The anti-anxiety medication Xanax (alprazolam) is occasionally used to alleviate OCD symptoms temporarily but is not considered an FDA-approved first-line OCD treatment given risks like addiction. As a fast-acting benzodiazepine, Xanax may provide short-term relief by rapidly reducing acute anxiety, panic attacks, and muscle tension—but does not treat underlying OCD drivers. While some report benefits, Xanax efficacy in OCD is unproven and experts recommend alternative evidenced-based treatments with better risk-benefit ratios long-term.

Emerging evidence shows certain natural remedies like cannabis and nutraceuticals may provide OCD relief and complement standard treatments like psychotherapy and antidepressants. Small clinical studies reveal medical cannabis containing THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids can reduce anxiety, obsessions, and compulsions for some patients by modulating endocannabinoid system dysfunction implicated in OCD. Supplements like NAC, inositol, and vitamin B12 may ease OCD symptoms by supporting serotonin pathways that are frequently disrupted in the disorder. 

While medications and CBT remain go-to OCD therapies, some individuals report additional benefits from pairing them with cannabis, nutraceuticals or lifestyle approaches like probiotics, diet changes, exercise, mindfulness and yoga—perhaps by synergistically influencing multiple physiological pathways underlying obsessive-compulsive disorder. 

Top Sellers

New? Start with our Ultimate Sampler!
The Ultimate nama Sampler
The Ultimate nama Sampler
Save $4.05 THC
THC Sampler
THC Sampler
THC
relax plus thc gummies on white background
relax plus gummies with description and ingredients
From $27.00
Relax Plus Gummies

THC: 5 mg | CBD: 25 mg

THC
sleep plus gummies on white background
sleep plus thc gummies with descriptions and ingredients
From $27.00
Sleep Plus

THC: 2 mg | CBD: 25 mg | Melatonin: 3 mg

THC
Energy Gummies
Energy Gummies
From $27.00
Energy Gummies

THC: 2.5 mg | CBD: 5 mg

THC

Resources

Szejko, N., Fremer, C., & Müller-Vahl, K. R. (2020). Cannabis Improves Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder—Case Report and Review of the Literature. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 11. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2020.00681

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic. (2023, December 21). Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/obsessive-compulsive-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20354432

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. (n.d.). National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd

Mauzay D, LaFrance EM, Cuttler C. Acute Effects of Cannabis on Symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. J Affect Disord. 2021 Jan 15;279:158-163. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2020.09.124. Epub 2020 Oct 6. PMID: 33049434.

Nicolini, H., Jaime, J., Delia, A., Villatoro Velázquez, J. A., Camarena, B., Fleiz Bautista, C., Aguilar García, A., Lanzagorta, N., & Elena, M. (2021). Cannabis Use in People With Obsessive-Compulsive Symptomatology: Results From a Mexican Epidemiological Sample. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12, 664228. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2021.664228

nama CBD FDA & legal disclaimer

Our products are not intended as medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment of any disease. They are not a replacement for prescription medications and have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

The information provided on this website does not and is not intended to, constitute legal advice or any statements of the status of any laws. Any information, content, and materials available on this site are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to be relied upon for any purpose.

Readers of this website should contact their attorney to obtain advice concerning any particular legal matter including decisions on what products are, or are not, legal to sell, possess, or consume. No reader, user, or browser of this site should act or refrain from acting based on information on this site without first seeking legal advice from their counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.

Only your attorney can provide assurances that the information contained herein – and your interpretation of it – is applicable or accurate for your particular situation. Use of, and access to, this website or any of the links or resources contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship between the reader, user, or browser, and website authors, contributors, contributing law firms, or committee members and their respective employers.

More articles

Comments (0)

There are no comments for this article. Be the first one to leave a message!

Leave a comment

Please note: comments must be approved before they are published